Por el Departamento de Estudios de AmChamPor el Departamento de Estudios de AmCham


In this article, AmCham’s Research Department looks at the state of Georgia and its interest in attracting Chilean investors.

The economic crisis has hit the whole world but the 9.5 million people of Georgia are optimistic about the future. As the ninth fastest-growing state in the U.S., Georgia has many attributes that help to maintain its attractiveness, even in difficult times.

With an annual output of US$ 379 billion – or US$ 40,533 per capita – its cost of living is among the lowest in the U.S. In addition, the state’s geographic position, infrastructure and pro-business policies make it a very advantageous location for new businesses, says Brian Wilson, the Chilean representative of Georgia’s Department of Economic Development.

A number of Chilean companies – CMPC, SQM, Agrosuper, Masisa, Química Härting and Arauco – are among the 1,700 overseas businesses from more than 44 countries with operations in Georgia. Wilson hopes that more will follow their lead.

“The economic crisis will not last forever, which is why Georgia is preparing to receive new investments and business,” he says, “and Chilean companies will find a secure environment and personalized treatment.”

The state offers a range of support to facilitate the arrival of overseas companies. It helps investors interested in Georgia to find offices and make contact with consultants, lawyers and accountants. In addition, it provides guidance on local sources of financing and information about local operating costs and business networks.

For investors, it also has an International Business Concierge Program, provided free of charge by its Department of Economic Development. The services available under this program include assistance in obtaining social security documents, a bank account and immigration visas and advice on finding schools and housing, buying a car and obtaining a driver’s license as well as on insurance and tax matters.

In Georgia, investors also have the advantage of the state’s high-quality logistics infrastructure. Goods can be imported through two major ports: Savannah, which is the fourth largest in the U.S. in container traffic, and Brunswick, which is the sixth.

For land transport, the state has over 2,000 kilometers of highways and more than 8,000 kilometers of railroad. These connections mean that 80% of the U.S. market is within just two days’ reach.

There are, moreover, direct daily flights between Santiago and the state’s capital, Atlanta, arriving at the city’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport. This offers daily connections to more than 500 destinations.

International hub

But, as well as modern transportation infrastructure, companies look for growing markets with low business costs, a favorable business climate and high quality of life. Without doubt, Georgia complies with all these requirements, says Wilson.

The economic stability it has enjoyed for many years reflects investor confidence in the state, he adds. Today, 13 Fortune 500 companies – including Coca-Cola, Home Depot, UPS, Delta Air Lines and Rubbermaid – operate there.

As companies seek competitive advantages, they are looking with growing interest at the south-east of the U.S. This area, which is home to 54 million people, would – if it were a country – be the world’s fifth largest economic power.

Georgia’s abundant resources, dynamic business climate and innovative economy also contribute to investor confidence, says Wilson. “In Georgia, the growth and prosperity of companies transform their expectations into reality.”

The state’s main economic activities are technology and telecommunications, the manufacture of industrial machinery, chemicals, textiles, wood products, cellulose and paper, agriculture and the aerospace and vehicle manufacturing sectors. “So there is plenty of room for development,” notes Wilson.

More than 60 countries have consular or commercial offices or bilateral chambers of commerce in Georgia. “The state also has ten international offices to help foreign companies to establish operations in the state,” emphasizes Wilson.

Georgia’s culture of success has produced generations of dynamic executives who, in addition to sharing business practices, also partner in the development and prosperity of their communities, he says. It also has a high quality of life, he adds, offering its inhabitants a broad range of sports, cultural and leisure activities. Its climate and diverse geography – with 160 kilometers of coastline, the Appalachian Mountains, the largest artificial lake on the East Coast and impressive parks – draw visitors from all over the world.

This is why, each year, 100,000 people move to live in Georgia, notes Wilson. Indeed, a U.S. Census Bureau study listed it as the state with the fourth largest and fastest-growing population in the entire country. Just another reason to take advantage of the comparative benefits that Georgia offers for tourism as well as for life and business.

ProChile, Chile’s export promotion agency, is in the process of opening a local office in Atlanta, Georgia, to be headed by Alejandro Moya as trade commissioner. He can be contacted at amoya@direcon.cl.

In this article, AmCham’s Research Department looks at the state of Georgia and its interest in attracting Chilean investors.

The economic crisis has hit the whole world but the 9.5 million people of Georgia are optimistic about the future. As the ninth fastest-growing state in the U.S., Georgia has many attributes that help to maintain its attractiveness, even in difficult times.

With an annual output of US$ 379 billion – or US$ 40,533 per capita – its cost of living is among the lowest in the U.S. In addition, the state’s geographic position, infrastructure and pro-business policies make it a very advantageous location for new businesses, says Brian Wilson, the Chilean representative of Georgia’s Department of Economic Development.

A number of Chilean companies – CMPC, SQM, Agrosuper, Masisa, Química Härting and Arauco – are among the 1,700 overseas businesses from more than 44 countries with operations in Georgia. Wilson hopes that more will follow their lead.

“The economic crisis will not last forever, which is why Georgia is preparing to receive new investments and business,” he says, “and Chilean companies will find a secure environment and personalized treatment.”

The state offers a range of support to facilitate the arrival of overseas companies. It helps investors interested in Georgia to find offices and make contact with consultants, lawyers and accountants. In addition, it provides guidance on local sources of financing and information about local operating costs and business networks.

For investors, it also has an International Business Concierge Program, provided free of charge by its Department of Economic Development. The services available under this program include assistance in obtaining social security documents, a bank account and immigration visas and advice on finding schools and housing, buying a car and obtaining a driver’s license as well as on insurance and tax matters.

In Georgia, investors also have the advantage of the state’s high-quality logistics infrastructure. Goods can be imported through two major ports: Savannah, which is the fourth largest in the U.S. in container traffic, and Brunswick, which is the sixth.

For land transport, the state has over 2,000 kilometers of highways and more than 8,000 kilometers of railroad. These connections mean that 80% of the U.S. market is within just two days’ reach.

There are, moreover, direct daily flights between Santiago and the state’s capital, Atlanta, arriving at the city’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport. This offers daily connections to more than 500 destinations.

International hub

But, as well as modern transportation infrastructure, companies look for growing markets with low business costs, a favorable business climate and high quality of life. Without doubt, Georgia complies with all these requirements, says Wilson.

The economic stability it has enjoyed for many years reflects investor confidence in the state, he adds. Today, 13 Fortune 500 companies – including Coca-Cola, Home Depot, UPS, Delta Air Lines and Rubbermaid – operate there.

As companies seek competitive advantages, they are looking with growing interest at the south-east of the U.S. This area, which is home to 54 million people, would – if it were a country – be the world’s fifth largest economic power.

Georgia’s abundant resources, dynamic business climate and innovative economy also contribute to investor confidence, says Wilson. “In Georgia, the growth and prosperity of companies transform their expectations into reality.”

The state’s main economic activities are technology and telecommunications, the manufacture of industrial machinery, chemicals, textiles, wood products, cellulose and paper, agriculture and the aerospace and vehicle manufacturing sectors. “So there is plenty of room for development,” notes Wilson.

More than 60 countries have consular or commercial offices or bilateral chambers of commerce in Georgia. “The state also has ten international offices to help foreign companies to establish operations in the state,” emphasizes Wilson.

Georgia’s culture of success has produced generations of dynamic executives who, in addition to sharing business practices, also partner in the development and prosperity of their communities, he says. It also has a high quality of life, he adds, offering its inhabitants a broad range of sports, cultural and leisure activities. Its climate and diverse geography – with 160 kilometers of coastline, the Appalachian Mountains, the largest artificial lake on the East Coast and impressive parks – draw visitors from all over the world.

This is why, each year, 100,000 people move to live in Georgia, notes Wilson. Indeed, a U.S. Census Bureau study listed it as the state with the fourth largest and fastest-growing population in the entire country. Just another reason to take advantage of the comparative benefits that Georgia offers for tourism as well as for life and business.

ProChile, Chile’s export promotion agency, is in the process of opening a local office in Atlanta, Georgia, to be headed by Alejandro Moya as trade commissioner. He can be contacted at amoya@direcon.cl.

Comentarios